Rhythm Patterns & Poetry

By Lee Nelson

Hello Everyone!
Welcome to my wiki.

For this assignment I decided to create my wiki incorporating the two subject areas of music and language arts. I am currently teaching music at an elementary school in Manhattan. One of the first concepts I embark on with my students is the concept of rhythm. My students always have a fun time when they are creating, playing and dancing to rhythm patterns. In this wiki we will explore different rhythm patterns, then create poetic phrases that will go along with the rhythm patterns. At first I will set up the rhythm patterns to be used for the poems, but eventually once the concept is understood the patterns and ideas are almost limitless. I would love to hear feedback with patterns and poems that you create.

If you would like more information on rhythm patterns and poetry take a look at these web sites:

http://kf016.k12.sd.us/lesson_two.htm

http://www.uncg.edu/~htkirbys/intro.html

http://www.tnellen.com/cybereng/lit_terms/rhyme.html

http://www.angelfire.com/ct2/evenski/poetry/rhythm.html



Rhythm


First let me explain three basic rhythm symbols used in music; the quarter note (Q), the quarter rest (QR), and two eighth notes beamed together (E – E).

The quarter note receives one beat. To understand the quarter note concept, tap your foot on the floor while counting 1, 2, 3, 4 for each tap. Keep repeating this exercise counting the four numbers. We will call this the beat (or pulse) of our rhythm. Next clap your hands at the same time as you tap your foot. You are now clapping quarter notes to a steady beat. I will use a Q to symbolize the quarter note in the activity.

The quarter rest also receives one beat, except you rest for that beat instead of clapping. I will use a QR to represent the quarter rest. (This might seem a bit confusing, but once we get into the activity you will understand.)

The eighth note receives half of a beat. For this activity we will use two eighth notes together. Two eighth notes beamed together equals one beat. This makes it easy to stay on beat for this activity. Once again tap your foot on the floor counting 1, 2, 3, 4. Next continue to count, but add an “and” sound in-between each number so it sounds like this 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &. Remember, your foot is only tapping on the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 not on the &’s. Now clap your hands to what you are counting 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &. You are now clapping eighth notes over a quarter note beat.

Once you understand these concepts you can make up any combination of symbols to create a variety of patterns.


Examples:


Q = Quarter Note (Play for one beat)
QR = Quarter Rest (Do not to play for one beat)
E – E = 2 Eighth Notes (play two sounds for one beat)

1.
Count
1
2
3 &
4
Clap
Q
Q
E - E
Q

2.
Count
1 &
2
3
4
Clap
E - E
Q
Q
QR

3.
Count
1
2
3 &
4
Clap
Q
QR
E - E
QR



Poetry


Now let’s add some words to our rhythms to make a rhythmic poem.

Choose words syllables to speak for each sound that you are clapping.


Example:


Count
1 &
2
3
4
Clap
E - E
Q
Q
QR
Say
Roses
are
red


Count
1 &
2
3
4
Clap
E - E
Q
Q
QR
Say
Violets
are
blue


Count
1
2
3
4
Clap
Q
Q
Q
Q
Say
I
like
school
work

Count
1
2
3
4
Clap
Q
Q
Q
QR
Say
So
do
you!



Activity



Now let’s try to create a four line poem using this rhythm pattern:

Count
1 &
2
3
4
Clap
E- E
Q
Q
QR


Good luck! I can’t wait to see what you come up with. If you feel adventurous, try to create a new rhythm or rhythms to go along with a new rhythmic poem.

This is wonderful! I think it's possible to spin this for high school students by incorporating hip-hop into the exercizes and have students create rhythms that other students can rhyme to. Far-fetched, but possible. --Jason Feliciano

This sounds like a fun project. It looks complicated but workable. Theses are very familiar practices for learning songs too. This reminds me of Haikus that we worked on in Poetry. We had lost of fun with this. You may want to check out this website on Haikus. Great job!
{Arleen Chan}

I have always wanted to learn those beats and rests so that when I want to get students undivided attention I can do that by clapping or playing an instrument. Thank you for sharing. I was thinking about this...
Now that I have those little catchy rhythmns I can incorporate them into my daily classroom management. I envision using different rhythmns and instruments for different transition sessions. Each time I need students to stop, look and listen they will hear and repeat (with clapping) a rhythmn which signals a particular transition.
Wonderful work!
deirdre doherty 7/25